Chemotherapy

A support group for everything about chemotherapy, being treated and side effects. Tell others about your experiences and get answers to your questions.

1st Chemo session anxiety

PizzBiz51
Posted by

Hi Everyone, I was diagnosed beginning Oct with Stage 1 Ovarian and Uterine cancer following a hysterectomy in October.  I’m now having Carbo/pac combo chemo for 6 cycles which started Weds.  I have started to get throbbing pain in my thumb which is an old injury and was wondering if this is nerve pain relating to where the Canula was sited nearby.  It’s so painful it’s keeping me awake at night.  Any advise would be great x

Carolyn28
Posted by

hi

welcome to the online community sorry you had to come and find us

I'm going to say that any pain really ought to be investigated, especially pain around an insertion which might be an infection which could be easily remedied with a dose of antibiotics.

Your body's immune system is now compromised and you do need to be vigilant to infections. 

Do you have a thermometer and have you been instructed to keep an eye on your temperature ?

For even minor infections the "door to needle time" is less than one hour. That is from you reporting a raised temperature to being treated with IV antibiotics whilst undergoing chemotherapy because there is a risk of sepsis. 

Sepsis is where an infection takes over the body whilst in a reduced immune or immunocompromised situation. 

It's a Sunday evening and I'd suggest calling the local A&E if your temperature is over the normal 39C/99F and see what they say. 

Mostly you'd have other symptoms like a fever, cold sweats, shivering, tender limbs, feeling very unwell, not just a bit of throbbing in your thumb but that's not always the case. 

I breezed through chemo, allegedly, I don't really remember it to be honest.  I know I felt tired, and slept a lot. I remember my feet hurting but that was tax and it doesn't look like you're having that. I didn't get any infections but a lot of people do. 

Do you feel a bit 'fluey"?

hugs

Carolyn

xxx

 real life success stories to remind you that people do survive breast cancer

https://community.macmillan.org.uk/cancer_types/breast-cancer/f/38/t/115457

Dr Peter Harvey

https://www.workingwithcancer.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/After-the-treatment-finishes-then-what.pdf

 

PizzBiz51
Posted by

Hi Carolyn, thanks for the reply.  I had been taking my temp and it’s normal.  The thumb is an existing nerve injury which I think is for some reason now been aggravated.  I will call the cancer centre tomorrow if it’s no better as it would be good to get some idea on pain relief.  

Its good to hear you are having a reasonable time through your treatment as you did hear a lot of scare stories.  

Onwards and upwards I think and need to keep positive.

wishing you all the best x

Carolyn28
Posted by

morning

I just looked it up and your chemo does contain the taxane which does affect nerves. Peripheral neuropathy, which they may have warned you about. 

I think my right foot going numb might have been associated with that. 

Pain relief is trial and error. My feet were so painful I couldn't rest the quilt on them at night and I had restless legs. I didn't associate this with this peripheral neuropathy but easily could have been that.

In the end I used a combination of a muscle relaxant and a codeine derivative. 

LOT is how you remember which of the diazepam family metabolise in the gut rather than the liver, which is good for whilst on chemo, lorazepam oxazepam and temazepam I think that's right but the doctors will know, I was given lorazepam to dissolve under my tongue whilst having a PIC line fitted. 

I tried co-codamol but that didn't work and in the end had DHC which is Dihydrocodeine, it's very similar to codeine phosphate but that didn't work for me. 

it's as well to start with milder pain relievers first and if it's just your thumb maybe even a local one, voltarol or something?

Check with your team. 

If they haven't told you, you also need to stay hydrated, it's easier to stick cannulas in you but it also helps avoid DVT. 

I tried to walk (and still do try and walk) 6000 steps per day, which is round our local park, and I managed it most days, I definitely felt better when I did than when I didn't. 

take care of yourself

hugs

Carolyn

xxx

 real life success stories to remind you that people do survive breast cancer

https://community.macmillan.org.uk/cancer_types/breast-cancer/f/38/t/115457

Dr Peter Harvey

https://www.workingwithcancer.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/After-the-treatment-finishes-then-what.pdf