Reflecting - a serious post!

This morning I watched bits of the Remembrance Service from last night  (and Strictly highlights too but thats not what this is about!)

So Remembrance Service - It got me thinking about life, all of us , our experiences and what bought us all here now.

We are no doubt a mixed bunch of people with varying degrees of grief, anxieties and hope for the future. As a generation most of us won't have experienced the traumas or hardships that our parents and grandparents did, I consider myself so lucky that my Stepdad survived the D-Day landings and bought such joy into my Mums life, my life and the lives of my children.

However, for me the programme reinforced my belief that we are the lucky ones- we got to say goodbye. 

It may not always feel like it  to all of you, but you should take comfort from the fact that you played such an important role in the passing of your loved ones and gave them the comfort and support they needed right up to the end.

We may not all be war heroes but we all sacrificed something - our own feelings were put to the side when we were needed the most and for that I think we should all be very proud of ourselves.

Lizzy x

  • Hi Lizzy

    That is very thought provoking and true. My brother took part in that service in the late 80's. He served 22 years in the RN and as you know Ric was ex army. The effects of PTSD were huge for him. 

    This is the first year I have not been involved in a parade since I was 7. We have always been in scouting and I was a cub leader.

    We were lucky in our family, everyone came home although both Ric and my brother lost good friends.

    Although I lost Ric suddenly, we did have time to prepare. 

    Take care everyone

    • Love and hugs Alison xxx
  • I think those of us who served never really wonder about the fact we may have been asked to die for country, it was just part of the job and speaking as a war pensioner we sometimes feel that's it but days like today remind us people, ordinary people remember...

    "Sometimes life is hideous, other times it's worse!"

  • I think those of us who served never really wonder about the fact we may have been asked to die for country, it was just part of the job and speaking as a war pensioner we sometimes feel that's it but days like today remind us people, ordinary people remember...

    "Sometimes life is hideous, other times it's worse!"

  • I think you are right there Mccmcc, neither my husband or brother thought of it as any thing special. It was what they did. 

    Xxx

  • Hi Lizzie and all,

    what a beautiful and indeed thought-provoking post and I think it is so true, for me at least. To be able to accompany our partners through the worst time in their lives and then to be able to say goodbye to them is such a beautiful thing and will always stay in our hearts and minds. From that prospective, there is really nothing to be sad about.

    Love, Mel

    I don't like the term "moving on" because it sounds to me like we are leaving our loved ones and the life we had with them behind. I like the term "moving forward" as it implies that, while life goes on, our loved ones are still with us in our hearts and minds. 

  • This morning I met a woman in her 50s whose husband died of a heart attack in the car with her -no warning, no goodbyes, no notice - I feel fortunate to have had a period of knowing and being able to be together to value the time left - humbling. 

  • A school friend lost her husband to a stroke in Feb, then a work colleague of Colin lost his wife out of the blue in March  with no warning at all- mega shocks to both of is!! So, yes NellieJ we were fortunate xx

    Tomorrow is another day