Womb (uterus) cancer

A place for people affected by womb cancer (also known as uterus or endometrial cancer) to support one another, ask questions, and share their experiences.

Feeling wobbly

Minto
Posted by

Thank you GrannyA. I’ve managed to get myself up this afternoon. It is comforting to know other people are going through the same things.

I was progressing slowly but improving since my surgery and this  infection has just floored me. I’m concerned that I have to get fit to start my chemo - 6 cycles to be followed by radiotherapy. Like you I have a grade 3 , but unfortunately stage 3. I suppose in the back of my mind it has spread to my bladder. I’m seeing oncologist on Monday so hope he will look at that.

Good luck with the bladder retraining! I’m sitting here with leg crossed saying to myself ‘I don’t need to go yet ‘ I suppose when you think about the surgeon digging around it is not surprising there is peripheral damage. Even bruising can take that be longer when we get that bit older. (As you are a Granny I’m assuming we are of an age - I’m 65).

I do think I will take your advice and try a short walk. The sun is shinning here and looks like it might be a nice evening.

Thanks for replying - take good care of yourself x 

Minto

NannyAnny
Posted by

Hi Minto,

Before I had children I had a lot of trouble with cystitis. I found it took 2 days after starting antibiotics before I even began to feel better, and always felt whacked afterwards!

After my hysterectomy I had the opposite to you. I couldn't feel a thing and went to the toilet by time! I read that you had to retrain your bladder. I was back at the hospital after 2 days out being checked as I had a rubbish night up every 2 hours to pass a thimbleful. They said it was all just settling down and I think I was badly bruised. Of course, the nerves don't help!!!

2 years later, my waterworks are better than before the operation. And I rarely need to get up in the night!!

I do think walking helps your muscles to return, but steadily increase the amount, don't go mad. By the way, I  was 72 when I had the operation. If I ached I stopped and put my feet up. The consultant said I ought to regain my fitness after 3 months and that was about right.

All the best xxxxx

GrannyA
Posted by

Well done! You are right, I am also 65  

Yes I was told the bladder was ‘bashed and bruised’. 

My consultant and I were both surprised that I was 1a as we expected a higher stage with the grade 3 cancer. I was lucky it was caught so early. 

Make a list for Monday and don’t hold back if you you are worried or have questions. 

Good luck! Let us know how you get on. 

Xx

GrannyA
Minto
Posted by

Thank you NannyAnny, that is really helpful and encouraging.

I’ve been given a 3 day course of antibiotics and I’ve just taken the 3rd dose. Maybe I will feel better in the morning.

 In March I was walking 5 miles several days a week, now I can hardly get round the garden -  baby steps on the road to recovery. 3 months seem like a good time frame.

 I need to be realistic! 

Good to hear from someone 2 years down the line! 

Minto

Fairycake
Posted by

Hello Minto, I’m sorry to hear you’ve been feeling so unwell. I hope the antibiotics kick in very soon. I was fortunate not to get any bladder issues after surgery but I do understand your frustration at not being able to walk very far. I found a daily walk helped my recovery but I agree, do build it up very slowly. However far you go, you have to get back. My surgeon made me promise that i would always take my mobile and some cash if I went out on my own just in case I suddenly felt too tired or unwell. It’s very easy to overdo things when you start to feel better. So do build up both time and distance gradually and if you can, try to go somewhere you can rest before the return journey. If you feel unwell or any pain, stop, rest, get a lift back if you can and let your CNS know. 

I-was also grade 3 stage 3c1 when my histology came through. You can read my story by clicking on my name. I had 6 cycles of chemo and 25 sessions of external radiotherapy. I’d say it was tough but doable. I’m happy to answer any questions if you want to chat about it anytime. I completed treatment 2 years ago and I’ve just been promoted to check ups every 6 months for the next 3 years. Going for adjuvant treatment is scary but they will look after you well and of course we are here to support you too. You will get through this. I’d just encourage you to take things a day at a time and to be very kind to yourself over the next few months. Gentle hugs coming your way x

NannyAnny
Posted by

Hi Minto,

I hope you are feeling better today.

When I was discharged from hospital I was given a little booklet with instructions for recovery. I found it invaluable, and followed it to the letter. As regards walking it says' Go for a 10 minute walk on the day you go home'. I found it took me all my time to walk across the car park at the hospital, so started that the next day!! It then says 'You should be able to walk for at least an hour a day after one month'. I gradually increased the walking from 10 mins to the hour!! And, like Fairycake says, remember you have got to get back so split the time between going and coming back!!!!

I found it frustrating at first, but was petrified of not recovering, so that made me sensible. And, ridiculous though it sounds, I found myself encouraged each time I walked a bit further!! And to walk in the countryside instead of round the block - WOW!!!! At three weeks I was very bored of the same walls and we decided to go away for a few days in our motorhome. I worried about bending down to my low pan cupboard, but I managed slowly, and the break did us both good.

I realise you may need further treatment, which must be daunting. I was lucky in that the operation was all I needed, but I nursed my daughter through breast cancer, operation, chemo and radiotherapy. She had some very down days, but got through it just by taking lt slowly. Six years later she is fine, and being sent round the country for work.

All the best. xxxxx

Minto
Posted by

Hello Fairy, 

thank you so much for your post. It so good to hear from a fellow grade 3 stage 3 and that you are 2 years down the road that i’m Just starting. I like the description of doable- I’ll hang on to that thought. I’m trying to be positive this morning, I’m up and about. I suppose what is worrying me is trying to be as fit as I can for chemotherapy starting and I’m failing miserably! But I do feel a bit better this morning so I’ll press on

Thank you for the gentle hugs. Much appreciated. 

Minto

Minto

Minto
Posted by

Hello NannyAnny,

i do feel better this morning thank you. I’m up and about and planning to walk round my local park. About 20 minutes.

Onwards and upwards! 

Minto

Minto

GrannyA
Posted by

Hello

I just wondered how you are doing today? I’m hoping you feel better. 

GrannyA
Minto
Posted by

Hi GrannyA,

i feeling much improved, thank you. Finished the antibiotics this morning,  not sure that the infection is totally away but a lot less wobbly! Will get in touch with GP tomorrow to get results

. I was at the cancer  hospital this morning to meet the Oncologist for the first time. He didn’t seem to alarmed by the infection which was actually quite reassuring. 

Feel quite positive today! 

Minto

Fairycake
Posted by

Hello good to hear your feeling a little more positive after seeing your oncologist. It does help enormously if you feel confident in your team. Try not to worry too much if your emotions are all over the place for a while, it comes with the territory I'm afraid. You will probably have good and not so good days for a while yet, particularly once you start adjuvant treatment (at least that was my experience) but things do level out eventually. Make the most of the good days. Keep a journal and try to write three good things in it each day - it can help you to keep some perspective on days when you're not feeling too great. X

Minto
Posted by

Hello Fairycake

 I was planning to keep a journal of symptoms / side effects but I do like the idea of noting good things too. That is a really good idea. I will be able to look back and see just how far I have come.

 I’m about 1 hour  journey to cancer centre in a part  of   a city I don’t know well at all and my normal habitat is  semi rural so that was well out of my comfort zone. My husband did a brilliant job getting us there in good time and finding a parking space! I plan to use the cancer care transport service we have here when I actually start chemotherapy but it does seem less daunting now I’ve been there. It was so busy, so many people  of all ages with this horrible  disease. Humbling.

Thank you 

Minto

NannyAnny
Posted by

Hi Minto,

When my husband was treated for throat cancer 12 years ago we actually worked out how many people they saw at the same clinic, as we had to wait about 2 hours! That was one day in one clinic in one hospital in one town. Multiply that by the number of days in a week, the number of different kinds of cancer clinics, the number of hospitals and the answer is mind blowing.

It is indeed humbling!!!

Its good you've got transport. I remember my husband going for his radiotherapy, and he must have been nervous. Although the parking was free the spaces were few and very tight. He unfortunately hit one of those silly posts!!! Not his best day!!!  xxxxx

GrannyA
Posted by

That is so good to read Minto. I am glad you are feeling brighter.

Take care x

GrannyA