HORMONE SWEATS

Hi all Jim788 here seemed to have sorted this new upgrade. One of my last posts I had a minor falling out with the NHS, I had asked my GP if there was anything that could help with my sweats, which were very bad and what I got back from the NHS was a antidepressant. I am on full PIP decided to see a private cancer consultant, just made the virus disappear at £200 an hour. I got a prescription for 50mg cyproterone acetate one per day and I am seven weeks in and my sweats have been reduced 70% plus the intensity of them.  My CT SCANS were stopped and he also agreed as my PSA  was always low he would see if he could get them restarted and hey presto they have so £200 well spent

I would like all to note the NHS in my view is very good here comes the but as we all know there are financial constraints just give us options even dare I say it in the private sector. I have just recently replied to a guy who was told no need for scans PSA  was the norm I have been told my PSA should be around 66 its just gone up to two when I got my diagnosis my PSA was 4.5  

  • "just made the virus disappear at £200 an hour"
    What virus? What do you mean?

    "I have been told my PSA should be around 66"
    Who told you that? What was their reason?

    Good Luck with the cyproterone acetate.

    - - -

    Heinous

    A healthy-looking decrepit, 69-year-old male, mentally alert but forgetful. I no longer have an urge to choke people who say "all you need to beat cancer is the right attitude" - better to smile and move on.

  • A particular antidepressant is used for hot flushes and works well.  I have also been prescribed that as a muscle relaxant to help me sleep - it worked too well on the sleeping front and I felt drugged until mid morning but just because something is used for one thing doesn't always mean it doesn't work for another.  Having said that don't know why your GP didn't prescribe cyprotene as it is a common medication for hot flushes - maybe cost? 

    A PSA of 66 is high.  When I was diagnosed NICE guidelines stated that a PSA of  6 or over for someone over 70 should be watched with a PSA test every 3 to 6 months - especially if PSA was rising or there was a big jump in PSA along with other symptoms with a digital exam once a year.  My GP refused ont he grounds that if he gave every man over 70 with a PSA of over 6 a PSA every 3 to 6 months he would be bankrupted - I wasn't asking him to test everyone just me.  I was already having annual checks with a urologist because I had suffered from enlarged prostate for some time and had a TURP back in 2004 - done privately as NHS wouldn't do it for me in my area.  Unfortunately when refused more frequent testing I didn't have a private PSA test - which I could have done at a local private hospital for £80.00 and a year later when I had my annual check with urologist PSA had gone from 6 to 9 to 12 and diagnosed with cancer.  I know I would have had the same treatment if diagnosed a year earlier but rad. oncologist I eventually paid to see for first consultation said I should have had a biopsy when PSA reached 9 - like you I saw 3 on the NHS at different hospitals one moving to USA after first consultation as I lived out in the sticks and different hospitals further and further away dealt with diffierent things, 

    I think the PSA has been revised down to a PSA of 5 now?  Our PSA rises as we get older naturally so small rises keeping it under 5/6 seem to be OK unless there are other symptoms connnected with prostate function or enlargement.  Of course PSA is an indicator that something is wrong with the prostate and is not necessarily an indicator of cancer at that particular time but a MpMRI followed by biopsy would likely show if cancer is involved - though even this can be missed if cancer is small and can be missed if small on PET scan too  - medical science is not an exact science, which is why we need continuous testing annually and if any changes DEs, scans and biopsies.  Also, as many here know a low PSA doesn't mean that cancer is not present either.  If you have symptoms see a Doc and get it checked.  I am afraid that many men do not "fancy" a DE or biopsy (goodness who does?) so avoid it or put symptoms such as urinating frequently or at night down to old age, back ache down to working hard in the garden etc. 

    I am glad your CT scans have been restarted and that cyprotene is working for you.  You have been unlucky with all the changes in the people providing your care and then C19 so as you say £200 well spent. 

  • The corvid 19 seems to me to have stopped all normal workings of the NHS  I went  and had a PRIVATE CONSULTATION FACE TO FACE NO PROBLEM. Private sector DOESENT SEEM  TO BE AS AFFECTED AS The NHS IS ON MY PRIVATE CONSULTATION MY CANCER IS SUCH MY PSA reading should be much higher than it is they seem to be scratching their heads 

    Best wishes,
                        Jim
  • Good luck to you, I'm glad it's going well.
    Try not to obsess over your PSA - it's a very unreliable measure, as your consultant should have explained.

    I'm pleased that you're happy with your service, but my bigger feeling is sadness for the NHS, and those who can't afford to go private.

    Which is, of course, most people.

    You do know that most 'private consultants' spend 90% of their time doing NHS work? It's the same people. Just that private patients pay. Even most 'Harley Street Consultants' also do NHS work and most of the others trained in the NHS (obvs not those who came from other countries).

    Also, most of the CT Scanners and almost all of the radiotherapy machines are NHS machines.

    Weird really, isn't it?

    - - -

    Heinous

    A healthy-looking decrepit, 69-year-old male, mentally alert but forgetful. I no longer have an urge to choke people who say "all you need to beat cancer is the right attitude" - better to smile and move on.

  • ,

    Best wishes,
                        Jim
  • Sorry seemed to have lost my reply to you just disappeared me and computers, AS I was saying I know PSA is not reliable, that's been my problem do consultants and GPs?. My scans were stopped and I was told my cancer was stable, how was this known as I hadn't had a scan. My belief my consultant was going on my PSA reading, before I had a chance to ask questions he left for pastures new. Unto consultant number 3, then CORVID 19 come along.in my view what has made me angry CORVID 19 has taken over the NHS to the expense of every else. As you rightly say most consultants work for the NHS  one cant see them because of the CORVID situation, if you can afford to go private its not a problem the CORVID situation disappears at £200 per hour  

    Best wishes,
                        Jim