Results are in for Dad

Hi everyone (again!)

My dad got all his results back today and it's a T3aN0M0 which is good, I guess! The Dr said it had only just broken the lining of the prostate so still considered contained. However, his gleason score was 9 so the tumour is aggressive. 

He is starting HT today as tablets and is also going to be having injections? This will be for a month and then he will start external beam radiation therapy, again for 5 days a week, I think for a month? They then said they'll review how tumour is responding. I thought he may have been on HT for longer before starting RT, but is this due to the high gleason score? I wasn't with my dad when he got the results, otherwise I wouldve bombarded the Dr with questions! 

Can anyone explain what the injections are for? Is it just an added form of HT? My dad has taken it like a champ and just responded "let's just get on with the treatment then". Sure he is worried but I have assured him that the fact it hasn't spread is a really good thing.

As always, thanks all for the advice so far. Interested to hear from anyone with similar diagnosis and treatment plan :) 

  • Hi SJ,

    The Hormone Injections reduce the size of the tumor. I also started with tablets Bicalutamide for 28 days before going on to Prostap3. Beware that the tablets can increase blood pressure however once you finish the blood pressure drops again. I’m starting Radiotherapy in April which is 6 months from initial commencement of treatment. My PSA was originally 79.39 & dropped to 0.64 at the end of December. By shrinking the tumor it makes it easier to target the tumor. I’m on 37 sessions which will be a slightly lower dose than your dad’s. The 20 sessions is a harder but faster dose. I’m sure someone on here has had that or going through it at the moment.

    It’s always a good feeling when you start treatment. 

  • This is very helpful, thank you :)

    My dad is on blood pressure meds already so will see how they deal with this with his treatment.

    He's also been called back to the hospital next week for an x-ray which is odd, not sure why he's already had a bone scan etc. But will find out next week!

    Thanks again :) 

  • Hi 

    Scans and X-rays are part and parcel of what we have to go through, their checking or I think they will be, anything out of the ordinary, nothing to worry about, it’s best to find out anything small or large so it can be dealt with. If he’s like me I want to know everything, good or bad.

    Radiotherapy attacks the tumour reducing the size and containing the cancer, it’s usually done over four weeks twenty sessions, glad he’s keeping in high spirits that’s half the battle.

    Stay safe

    Joe

  • Thanks for the info Joe :) and yes I have to say all the doctors etc are being very quick and thorough which is great.

    Think we are all feeling a lot more positive now we know what's going on and have a plan.

    Thanks again

  •   I was 71 when diagnosed  in late 2018 with T3A N0 M0, Gleason 4+5=9 and PSA of 11. From first referral to the start of treatment was nearly six months and that was before Covid! By October 2018 my PSA had risen to 15 and I started on 28 days of Bicalutamide (which is to prevent a tumor flare) followed by Prostap injections just a few days later. I had two 1 month Prostap injections and then moved on to 3 monthly. I had my last Prostap 3 injection of the three year course in June 2021. It's normal to have a week or so of Bicalutamide before starting the injections but mine was much less. I think my GP was anxious to get me started on Prostap as the delays in diagnosis had been pretty horrendous and my father had died of PC at the age of 53 (OK, it was 50 years ago when diagnosis and treatment were nothing like we have today).

    I had 20 sessions of RT in February/March 2019. By the start of the RT sessions my PSA had dropped to 0.4 and three months later it was <0.1. It has remained at <0.1 ever since. I am now on 6 monthly PSA tests for the next two years and will then move on to annual tests. At the moment the PC appears to be in remission.

    There are side effects from both the HT & RT but I found them manageable and thankfully most have now gone away. I still have constipation as a result of what my GP describes as "Collateral damage from the RT", but that's easily managed too.

    It took about six months after the RT to get back to full fitness and overcoming the side effects of HT is mainly down to determination not to let it get to me. I am now 74 and swimming a mile twice a week, coastal rowing as much as the winds and tides allow and walking a lot. I have walked 22 miles so far this week for the Run the Month: Marathon Edition in support of PCUK and hope to have done a double marathon by the end of January.

    I hope that helps.

    Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery and today is a gift.
    Seamus
    (See my profile for more)