Brain tumours

A place for people affected by brain tumours or brain cancer to support one another, ask questions, and share their experiences.

Recovery time immediately after surgery

Worriedmum11
Posted by

My daughter had surgery on Wednesday to remove a large glimo deep within her left tempral lobe, it was located very close to her speech and language area.. I realise that any surgery to the brain causes great trauma but since surgery she has not been able to communicate and is drifting in and out of consciousness. It is heartbreaking to see her so vulnerable. Can anyone tell me when I can expect to see her a little more responsive, i do realise recovery is different for everyone but need reassurance that this is not perminant x

Carolyn28
Posted by

hi

I was going to say welcome but I just double checked and realised I'd responded to your previous post.

You are of course correct that it will vary person to person. 

I would expect her team to allow her to rest for a few days to allow any risk for potential swelling or infection to ease then start the recuperation process to see how much if any damage has been done to her abilities to communicate. 

One experience I have is that my friend found she was missing a few words and she used to make new words up which although funny was pretty frustrating for her, but her husband thought she was completely normal. Therefore her perceptions of how 'normal' she is and your perceptions of how 'normal' she is may vary. 

I would have thought days and weeks rather than hours and minutes. 

There is also a critical time period for optimum recovery and you may find more help with the brain injury or stroke associations since they focus on complete and effective recovery just a little bit more than the brain tumours, for which mere survival is an excellent result. 

https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/rehabilitation-and-continuing-care/rehabilitation/

With my aunt, after she suffered a stroke,  we found she could say words if she had them in front of her, or a picture, much better than trying to recall on her own. Rather like re-learning with children's books. It's also easy to 'talk down' to someone who struggles to communicate, I had a long discussion with a friend of my husband after he suffered a stoke and found he couldn't join in a conversation as he wasn't as quick with his words as he once was. He wanted people to be patient with him but without making a big deal of it. 

I hope that helps a bit. 

How's the family generally ??

hugs

Carolyn

xxxx

 real life success stories to remind you that people do survive breast cancer

https://community.macmillan.org.uk/cancer_types/breast-cancer/f/38/t/115457