Ask about stem cell & bone marrow transplants

Jane is a haematology nurse with extensive experience in stem cell and bone marrow transplants. She also has experience in managing late side effects of transplants. She'll aim to respond within 2 working days.

Will a wound seroma affect bone marrow harvesting?

Purple Skylark
Posted by

Hello Jane.
My husband has Non-Hodgekin lymphoma Follicular & B cells. After radiotherapy and R-Chop chemo the offending node was removed from left groin first week of December 19. Sadly the cancer has not gone and his doctors recommend a course of RICE chemo treatment next.
The problem is the wound from the surgery has not healed and has turned into a seroma. It is finally now being dressed every day by nurses at the local clinic and he has had 2 courses of antibiotics.

He is stressing about how this will affect the possibility of harvesting his bone marrow and affect the course of treatment. He is considering more surgery on the area (privately) to try & speed things up. He is desperate & depressed and I am very worried 

I would be so kindly grateful for any thoughts & time you can spare to advise me/us

Jane N - Macmillan
Posted by

Hi Purple Skylark,

Sorry to hear your husband is having problems after his surgery.  

I would definitely recommend having a frank discussion with your husbands Haematologists about this. 

We have had patients before that have continued with chemotherapy despite wounds not having fully healed, we would want to see that healing is taking place, but know there would always be a risk of further infection in this area when blood counts drop. 

I certainly wouldn't undertake any further surgery without speaking to them first as it may not solve the problem but cause further delays.

I hope that helps

 

Jane

Remember you can also speak with the Macmillan Support Line team of experts. Phone free on 0808 808 0000 (7 days a week, 8am-8pm) or by email.  

Thehighlander
Posted by

Hi and welcome to the Community and some great advise from Jane.

So sorry to hear about the issues your husband is having and I do hope that things can be put in a positive direction so that he can get on with his Auto Stem Cell Transplant.

I am Mike and I help out in our dedicated Stem Cell Transplant support group...... please come over and join us as we have many folks who have been on the SCT rollercoaster both as patients and carers.

Just follow the link I have created then hit the ‘Join This Group’ tab just under the main group name, then go to the 'Start a Discussion' tab and set up your very own Discussion and introduce yourself to the group.

I have been through two Stem Cell Transplants with cells from my brother and I am now over 4 years post my second SCT......... so I do understand the journey you and your husband are about to go on.

I will keep an eye open for you.

Mike - Thehighlander

It always seems impossible until its done - Nelson Mandela

Purple Skylark
Posted by

Hi Jane 

Thank you so much for your reply. My husband was seen this week by a ‘tissue viability’ nurse. She has changed some of the dressings to be used but is happy that the wound is responding. He is feeling better about the situation overall, but is still required to attend for wound dressing every day.  Not sure how he will cope next week when chemo starts every day as well as wound dressing every day in different parts of the borough!?!

Thats next week’s problem!  Thanks again for your reassurance. Kindest Sue

Purple Skylark
Posted by

Hi Mike

Thank you for your message. I have joined your group and read your story. Truly heartbreaking at how some of us suffer yet totally inspiring at how we can rise above it and live!

Sue

Thehighlander
Posted by

Hi Sue, good that you have joined the SCT Group as it is a good place to get support from folks who understand the rather unique journey a SCT takes everyone.

We took the view that having SCT available and me being fit and able to go through the treatment was a big bonus....... as 6 years back, it was a role of the dice situation.

Throughout our 20 years cancer journey the most important thing we did was looked at how we positioned ourselves on an imaginary line.

This line had despair at one end and positivity at the other........ we ensured that we never got close to the despair end and made a choice to always live in the positive end.

Lets walk this together and get you both out the other end ((hugs)) 

Mike - Thehighlander

It always seems impossible until its done - Nelson Mandela

Jane N - Macmillan
Posted by

Hi Sue,

While chemo nurses are not experts in wound dressings, they are still nurses and if you ask them they may be able to redress the wound for your husband, although I suspect you may need to get supplies of the dressing for them.  

It's always worth the ask....

Jane

Remember you can also speak with the Macmillan Support Line team of experts. Phone free on 0808 808 0000 (7 days a week, 8am-8pm) or by email.