Breast distortion

Hi I have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. I have been advised my mammogram, one was an enhanced mammogram showed breast distortion, nothing showed on ultrasound. I had a guided vacuum biopsy to diagnose.  When I saw my consultant he advised its small said about 1cm.   But no size given.  Could I have some information on breast distortion pls. I am not sure what questions to ask. Thank you 

  • Hi 

    Welcome to our online community and thanks for posting your question.

    I’m sorry to hear about your recent breast cancer diagnosis. It can be difficult to take all the information and know what questions to ask in at these appointments. Hopefully you will have an opportunity to do this at your next appointment. It might also be worth speaking to your breast care nurse (cancer nurse specialist).

    Breast distortion is just a way of describing how the breast tissue looks on a mammogram and/or ultrasounds. This usually means no mass or lump is visible, but the breast tissue does not look normal.

    We have a booklet understanding breast cancer that you might find helpful to read.  Preparing questions can help you get the most out of your appointments with your cancer team, here are a list of questions to ask your healthcare team.

    Breast Cancer Now are a breast cancer specific charity and have information about understanding your pathology results and questions you may want to ask

    It can help to chat things through either ahead of your next appointment or afterwards, once you have more information. If you think this is something you would benefit from please don’t hesitate to give our support line a call. We are available 8am-8pm, 7 days a week on 0808 808 0000.

    Best wishes,

    Amy (Macmillan Information Nurse Specialist)

     

  • Hi I am awaiting a clinic appointment with the plastic team to discuss my surgery, any idea how long it's been nearly 7 weeks since my first clinic appointment 

  • Hi Shaz52,

    Thanks for getting back in touch. I am sorry to read that you have waiting for a further 7 weeks to discuss your treatment plan. This wait must naturally be causing you increased worry any anxiety.

    There are national guidelines in place, in regard to investigating and diagnosing a suspected cancer, that should be followed.

    The guidelines state that a patient should expect “no more than 2 months (62 days) wait between the date the hospital receives an urgent referral for suspected cancer and the start of treatment”. This timeline allows for referrals, tests and further investigations to take place. This is to ensure the team understand all about an individual’s cancer to allow them to decide on the best and most effective treatment.

    It is understandable that any wait can cause you to worry that the delay may affect what is happening with your cancer. From what evidence shows, we know that most cancers tend to grow slowly.

    As it has been 7 weeks, and you have not heard anything about a further appointment, it is important to contact the breast care team to question this wait. You have the right to question why this is happening and to be offered an explanation. As your breast care team know your care and history well, they are best placed to advise and to offer you reassurance around what may be happening and explain why there may have been a delay in your surgical appointment.

    There is a breast cancer app (for phones/tablets), called Owise breast cancer, that is aimed at helping to support people with a breast cancer journey. Including keeping track of treatments, side effects and questions to ask the breast care team. I wondered if you may find this helpful to navigate your cancer journey.

    Please don’t hesitate to give one of our nurses a call to discuss this further or get back in touch if you have any further questions or concerns. We are always happy to take the time to talk things over with you.

    Wishing you well with your next appointment.

    Best wishes

    Audrey

    Macmillan Cancer Information Nurse Specialist

    Audrey - Macmillan Cancer Information Nurse Specialist