Welcome to the May 2019 travel insurance update.

Next month marks the longest day of the year and the first day of summer. Are you planning an early summer break? Perhaps you want to make the most of the cheaper deals and quieter crowds before the peak tourist season? June is a lovely time of year to go on holiday, with glorious sunshine, blue skies and rich vegetation.

We hope that the discussions on the travel insurance group give you some valuable recommendations.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the group in May. Several of you shared useful recommendations and tips for finding reasonable travel insurance after a cancer diagnosis.

Success story

Here is one of your success stories over the past month:

LADYLUNA got a good deal on a travel insurance comparison website:

‘I have travelled twice already this year and have another holiday booked. I was diagnosed last January with oesophagus cancer. My operation was in May 2018, followed by more chemotherapy.

In January 2019, we went to the Gambia on a 6-hour flight under a worldwide policy. I was told by a friend with pancreatic cancer who travelled all the time to go online and try these multi-choice insurance websites. So, I put in travel insurance with cancer, clicked the cheapest option and declared all my problems.

I got cover for £33.13 and that was including your normal baggage, delays, loss of passport, etc. For me and my husband, it came to £74.45. I was well pleased, as others wanted £200 to cover me and one company quoted £400.’

Useful tips

Here are some helpful travel insurance tips that you shared over the past month:

Nook uses brokers to find reasonable travel insurance rates:

‘I have been using brokers to sort out my travel insurance since 2016 and they have found very reasonable rates for me.

My annual worldwide policy is just over £200. As a comparison, quotes from other companies willing to ensure me post-cancer have been anything up to £1,000.

It seems to me that the main benefit of using a broker is that they can trawl the insurance market on my behalf and possibly access companies that I do not know about.

My insurance renews each August and I am hopeful that I will be able to get a cheaper premium this year. The brokers have told me that they can access different insurance companies as my check-up frequency reduces over time.’

TracyP highlights a recent survey on travel insurance for cancer patients:

‘A friend recently told me that Which? have just done a survey and produced a list of companies that covered pre-existing conditions. There is a chart of name of company, single or annual cover, age limits and whether terminal diagnosis is covered.’

www.which.co.uk/money/insurance/travel-insurance/travel-insurance-for-cancer-patients-a6kuw6h7x384

TracyP recommends phoning insurers rather than completing online forms:

‘I was initially declined an annual policy online, but I rang up, spoke to a real person and got the cover. So, my recommendation would be skip the online process and go straight to the phone. Make yourself a cuppa, make a list of dates when you were diagnosed, when you are seeing someone next and what drugs you take, and make the call.’

Travel and cancer information

If you are thinking of going on holiday, remember to look at Macmillan’s information on travel and holidays to help you get the most out of your trip. Our information includes:

  • how cancer treatment may affect your travels
  • information about vaccinations, immunisations and going abroad for treatment
  • taking care of yourself while you are away
  • things to consider when buying travel insurance
  • some of the words and terms you might hear when planning a holiday or getting travel insurance.

Visit the travel insurance group

Please keep sharing your experiences (good and bad) with us. You can visit the travel insurance group to start a new discussion.

Many thanks to LADYLUNA, Nook and TracyP for contributing to this blog.

Good luck and safe travels!