What is LDN?

Pancreatic cancer

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What is LDN?

No. of entries: 7 | Posted on 20 Jul 2012 03:31

What is LDN?

  • Someone mentioned LDN - can anyone tell me what this is?

    My mum is stage 4 PC with a poor prognosis.
    Thanks for your time.
    Jox

  • Hi

     

    its Low Dose Naltrexone - although I don't know anything about it. There are a couple of websites below that will give you more info

    http://www.ldnnow.co.uk/

    http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/ldn-research/105-about-the-ldn-research-trust.asp

    Hope it helps though

    xx

  • Thanks treaclepud - I'll check out the sites. Jox

  • Sorry I can't get the paragraphs to separate but please try to read it and see if it resonates with you... Low dose naltrexone might exert its effects on tumor growth through a mix of three possible mechanisms: By inducing increases of metenkephalin (an endorphin produced in large amounts in the adrenal medulla) and beta endorphin in the blood stream; By inducing an increase in the number and density of opiate receptors on the tumor cell membranes, thereby making them more responsive to the growth-inhibiting effects of the already-present levels of endorphins, which induce apoptosis (cell death) in the cancer cells; and By increasing the natural killer (NK) cell numbers and NK cell activity and lymphocyte activated CD8 numbers, which are quite responsive to increased levels of endorphins.1 (abstract) LDN boosts the immune system, activating the body's own natural defenses. Up to the present time, the question of "What controls the immune system?" has not been present in the curricula of medical colleges and the issue has not formed a part of the received wisdom of practicing physicians. Nonetheless, a body of research over the past two decades has pointed repeatedly to one's own endorphin secretions (our internal opioids) as playing the central role in the beneficial orchestration of the immune system, and recognition of the facts is growing. Witness these statements from a review article of medical progress in the November 13, 2003 issue of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine: "Opioid-Induced Immune Modulation: .... Preclinical evidence indicates overwhelmingly that opioids alter the development, differentiation, and function of immune cells, and that both innate and adaptive systems are affected.1,2 Bone marrow progenitor cells, macrophages, natural killer cells, immature thymocytes and T cells, and B cells are all involved. The relatively recent identification of opioid-related receptors on immune cells makes it even more likely that opioids have direct effects on the immune system.3" The brief blockade of opioid receptors between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. that is caused by taking LDN at bedtime each night is believed to produce a prolonged up-regulation of vital elements of the immune system by causing an increase in endorphin and enkephalin production. Normal volunteers who have taken LDN in this fashion have been found to have much higher levels of beta-endorphins circulating in their blood in the following days. Animal research by I. Zagon, PhD, and his colleagues has shown a marked increase in metenkephalin levels as well. [Note: Additional information for Dr. Zagon can be found at the end of this page.] Bihari says that his patients with HIV/AIDS who regularly took LDN before the availability of HAART were generally spared any deterioration of their important helper T cells (CD4+). In human cancer, research by Zagon over many years has demonstrated inhibition of a number of different human tumors in laboratory studies by using endorphins and low dose naltrexone. It is suggested that the increased endorphin and enkephalin levels, induced by LDN, work directly on the tumors' opioid receptors — and, perhaps, induce cancer cell death (apoptosis). In addition, it is believed that they act to increase natural killer cells and other healthy immune defenses against cancer. In general, in people with diseases that are partially or largely triggered by a deficiency of endorphins (including cancer and autoimmune diseases), or are accelerated by a deficiency of endorphins (such as HIV/AIDS), restoration of the body's normal production of endorphins is the major therapeutic action of LDN. Source: http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/#What_is_low_dose_naltrexone
  • I suggest people on this thread just enter 'naltrexone' and read the Wikipaedia page which has a section on this topic. And then click on reference 31 below the Wiki page.

    The clinical claims for LDN run well beyond any reasonably supported science. As the reference says, any treatment which is advocated for such a long list of purposes has to be treated with considerable suspicion.

  • This is about freedom of choice and information. The information on the websites is all on a not for profit basis,no one is promoting anything.We can make our own judgements on what we make of it - that is our right.