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  • Blog Post: Simply red ...

    My mother died 14 years ago, aged 53, of ovarian cancer. She had been diagnosed five years before ... but to be truthful the cancer had probably been there since her early forties, when she was a similar age to me. For a year or two they had said she was peri-menopausal and by the time they realised...
  • Blog Post: 7th April 2010 - Sobering words about fertility options

    We'd actually been intending to start a family this year and in our ideal world I would have been about 2-3 months pregnant when we got married in April. Just was well I wasn't with the discovery of the breast cancer in Februrary! Anyhow, this meant that retaining fertility throughout my treatment...
  • Blog Post: Family History in Brief

    I have a significant family history, mum was diagnosed with Breast Cancer aged 36 got ovarian cancer 2 years later and eventually died aged 44 from secondary ovarian cancer. The youngest of my aunties on her side to die did so at 28. The oldest was I think in her late forties. My closest cousin...
  • Blog Post: Looking forward to hearing these

    Sunday 7 November Thea Tlsty - Molecular alterations that predict premalignancy in breast cancer Chris Wild - Cancer research for cancer prevention: an international view Patricia Ganz - Cancer survivorship: a new challenge in delivering quality cancer care Derek Stewart - From presence...
  • Blog Post: Life is a rollercoaster ...

    You know ... I used to say “ if only I could have a pound for every compliment I receive for them red shoes.” However, over the last few weeks it would be for each time someone has said to me “Go sh ... doesn't time fly ... where did that year go ...? ” These comments have...
  • Blog Post: Cancer genetics – Helping people understand and manage their risk

    Only 5 to 10% of cancers are thought to be linked to inherited genes. But if there are several people who’ve had cancer in your family, you may be concerned about your own risk. If you’ve had cancer yourself, you may worry about your relatives’ risk. In this blog, we’ll tell...
  • Blog Post: The long road back to the new normal. (Life after cancer treatment).

    If you have finished treatment there is a belief that you should be jumping for joy. You’re in the clear; you don’t have cancer, why wouldn’t you be the happiest person on earth? It may frustrate you that people don’t understand, and are rushing you to get back to your old self...
  • Blog Post: Heart health and cancer treatment

    To see what else Macmillan's cancer information team has been blogging about, please visit our blog home page ! You can subscribe to receive our blogs by email or RSS too. Has your heart been affected by cancer treatment? Or do you have an existing heart condition as well as cancer? Macmillan...